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Conduct Management

Summary

Definition - needs anchor

Checklist - needs anchor

Application/Examples - needs anchor

 

Note.  The Definition and Checklist sections below are adapted fromSchoolwide and Classroom Management:  The Reflective Educator-Leader, by L.A. Froyen and A.M. Iverson, 1999, Upper Saddle River, N.J.: Prentice-Hall, pp. 181, 194-208.

Definition

"Conduct management refers to the set of procedural skills that teachers employ in their attempt to address and resolve discipline problems in the classroom" (Froyen & Iverson, 1999, p. 181).

Checklist of Observable Behaviors

___  1. Acknowledgment of responsible behaviors

___  2. Correction of irresponsible and inappropriate behavior

___  3. Ignoring

___  4. Proximity control

___  5. Gentle verbal reprimands

___  6. Delaying

___  7. Preferential seating

___  8. Time owed

___  9. Time-out

___ 10. Notification of parents/guardians

___ 11. Written behavioral contract

___ 12. Setting limits outside the classroom

___ 13. Reinforcement systems

Reference

Froyen, L. A., & Iverson, A. M. (1999). Schoolwide and classroom management:  The reflective educator-leader(3rd ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice-Hall.

Applications/Examples

Conduct Management

Definition

“Conduct management refers to the set of procedural skills that teachers employ in their attempt to address and resolve discipline problems in the classroom” (Froyen & Iverson, 1999, p. 181).

Examples

Teacher:  Terri Vennerberg

Grade:  3

In her Habitats activity, Terri Vennerberg uses the strategy of re-directing a group that displays off-task behavior and focuses their attention on their assignment.  Vennerberg’s correction of inappropriate and irresponsible behavior illustrates Conduct Management.

Teacher:  Vicki Oleson

Grade:  6

Vicki Oleson monitors the students as they work together in their groups. As the learners try to reach consensus on the topic, Oleson encourages them to remember ways of solving disagreement within the group. This demonstrates Conduct Management.

Teacher:  Lyn Countryman

Grade:  7

Lyn Countryman’s students are learning about the human heart by gathering and analyzing data on their own heart rates.  The teacher demonstrates Conduct Management as she corrects irresponsible and inappropriate behavior by reminding her students that one of the goals of working together is to respect one another. In addition, she encourages them to respond one at a time.

Teacher:  Teresa Farrell

Grade: 5-6

Teresa Farrell redirects inappropriate student behavior during her group work activity.  A student complains about another student kicking him underneath the table.  Farrell uses conduct management to get the students back on task and focused on the lesson.  This demonstrates conduct management. 

Reference

Froyen, L. A., & Ive]rson, A. M. (1999). Schoolwide and classroom management:  

The reflective educator-leader (3rd ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice-Hall.